Vendor Management: A Vital Component to Risk Mitigation

Risk mitigation involves many moving parts, including your employees. However, your employees are not the only human element affecting your potential for liability. Your vendors also need special consideration. Luckily, one of CARE’s industry partners, OmniSure,(1) has compiled a list of recommendations(2) for managing the risk exposure derived from working with third-party vendors.

Tips include:

  • Confirm that a current, signed contract or agreement is on file  
  • Maintain documented proof of current liability insurance
  • Create a process to ensure vendors are compliant with regulatory requirements, licensure, and liability coverage  
  • Verify that all independent contractors have a Federal Tax Identification Number
  • Keep copies of current professional liability and worker’s compensation insurance
  • Ensure each provider’s current license is on file  
  • If applicable: maintain current CLIA waiver to do lab work  
  • Keep contracts and agreements with supporting documentation in a centralized, secure location

OmniSure also has videos and podcasts about vendor relations if you would like more information from them.

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) have information, tips, and a searchable database(3) you can use so you can be confident in the liability you’re assuming when you hire vendors. Since the OIG has the authority to exclude individuals and entities from federally funded health care programs, you’ll want to check their LEIE (List of Excluded Individuals & Entities) database for vendors or contractors you plan to utilize at your facility.

If you don’t already have one, create a formalized process for performing due diligence on potential vendors and subcontractors. A documented process serves as the first layer of risk mitigation by ensuring that all new agreements go through the same vetting process. The next step is to train all personnel on this process so that nothing goes unnoticed or undone in the future.

Contact us today. We can review your professional liability policy to see if your current coverage provides protections for vendor liability.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.riskfitness.com/
  2. https://www.riskfitness.com/vendor-management-recommendations?cid=85fab4ed-3196-4e75-8828-a8ba9e4067ad
  3. https://oig.hhs.gov/exclusions/index.asp

Switching from Defense to Offense Amid a Crisis

We understand that our clients in the health care industry are inundated daily (dare we say hourly?) with information about COVID-19. You know how to handle the virus – for yourself, your practice, and your patients. If ‘triage’ wasn’t your middle name before the pandemic, it surely is now. You’re getting info from every news source, from your own administration and from health care experts around the globe. While we hope that our communications have been informative and helpful, we know it’s a lot to digest. And while it may sound difficult, now is the time to shift your focus. It’s time to move from defensive tactics to proactive planning.

You and your staff have been educated, and have learned from daily trial and error how to handle this crisis. With your business continuity plans tested and solidified, it’s time to turn your attention to new areas of focus. These include(1):

  • Workforce management: ensure employees that their personal safety, as well as nontangibles such as their mental well-being and work/life balance, are top priorities
  • Communications (internal and external): reach out to both your employees and your customers to let them know what you are doing to impact change during this crisis; remind them why they depend on you
  • Cybersecurity enhancements: times like these are ripe for exploiting weaknesses, so strengthen your security protocols before you experience a data breach
  • Operational changes: online breaches are not the only threat; access to physical locations needs a thorough review to ensure employee and patient safety
  • Supply chain plans: flexibility is the key to problem solving (for example: even non-virus-related issues, such as simple plumbing repairs at your practice, could take weeks due to parts availability and delayed delivery timelines)
  • Finance and liquidity: payment regulations shift constantly due to governmental oversight; be prepared for income fluctuations by forecasting multiple reimbursement models(2)
  • Regulatory influence: connect with both local and national government officials to offer valuable insight in crisis control and future pandemic planning

Yes, that’s quite an involved list. The good news is that it doesn’t all have to be accomplished today. Proper planning is paramount to switching to a proactive mindset. In the end, the investment of time, energy, money, and resources provides great payoff and benefits when compared with the alternative (wait-and-see) approach. One of the most important things you can do when developing these action plans is to remember why you got into the health care field in the first place. Those foundational principles(3) will guide you to building solid solutions for the elements outlined above.

Contact us today. Your professional liability coverage is just one of many tools you can leverage to set and attain the goals discussed here.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.pwc.com/us/en/library/covid-19/covid-19-and-insurance-industry.html
  2. https://www.forbes.com/sites/brentdykes/2020/04/29/why-your-business-must-double-down-on-data/#5bded2fe7a68
  3. https://hbr.org/2018/01/the-culture-factor

2020: The Perfect Storm

As if the pandemic itself was not enough of a hurricane-like event to the healthcare industry, the upcoming tsunami of lawsuits will surely drown what’s left of health care worker morale and mental health, not to mention bank accounts. The perfect storm of fast-paced changes and dwindling resources has left some providers wondering if their practice will stay afloat throughout 2020.

The healthcare world’s ancillary industries, such as liability and litigation support, ride the same wave of uncertainty and persistent changes in priorities. Weather disaster puns aside, we all must prepare for the upcoming litigation wave now within the confines of our current conditions.

Potential litigation points specific to the healthcare industry include(1):

  • Employment issues
  • Inadequate or improper provision of PPE(2)
  • Business interruption
  • Force majeure clauses in contracts
  • Price gouging complaints
  • Personal injury caused by negligence
  • Medical malpractice
  • Fraud or misrepresentation  

The first step to preparedness is education. Become familiar with how the bullet points listed above may affect your practice. Appoint someone in your organization to serve as a point person for all things pandemic-related. That way, all potential issues can be cross referenced and addressed quickly. This person’s duty is to stay attuned to ever-changing laws and regulations, both at the state and federal levels(3). Then they can take this information and scrutinize any internal policies for necessary updates and changes.

Staying proactive is paramount to staying ahead of potential litigation. Address issues before they become incidents to prevent costly disputes. We are all riding out this storm together, not as competitors, but as one large tribe, trying to save our families, our economy, our industries, ourselves, and each other.

If you are unsure whether your current policy provides adequate coverage for issues related to COVID-19, please contact us today. We can review your professional liability policy to ensure it aligns with current mandates and guidelines.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.natlawreview.com/article/be-prepared-onslaught-coronavirus-related-lawsuits
  2. https://www.marketwatch.com/story/what-we-are-confronting-now-is-really-unprecedented-coronavirus-related-lawsuits-are-poised-to-flood-the-courts-2020-05-08
  3. https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/05/08/lawsuit-coronavirus-congress/