Telemedicine Updates During an Evolving Crisis

It’s almost impossible to keep current on the constant barrage of new and evolving information regarding telemedicine care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The AMA has updated its Quick Guide(1), which is a series of playbooks that covers best practices and resources for patient care on virtual platforms. These playbooks cover topics such as:

  • Technology (platform options and features)
  • Budgeting and contracting with a vendor
  • Implementation
  • Developing policies
  • Staff training
  • Patient education
  • Coding
  • Payments
  • Other helpful resources

The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services(2) also provides a robust website with information on these topics. They even have a separate web page with information for consumers if your patients are seeking resources and education about how telehealth works. The Center for Connected Health Policy website(3) is also a good resource. Their site breaks down current laws and reimbursement policies at the state level for telemedicine care.

Telemedicine isn’t solely dedicated to COVID-19 patients. It is a smart solution for patients with chronic conditions because it helps minimize potential spread of the virus to the medically fragile population. Telemedicine is also a great option for patients with sudden emergencies. Reducing the number of walk-in patients at provider offices, urgent care clinics, and hospital emergency rooms exposes as few patients as possible to potential infection. Telemedicine can mitigate risk while still delivering care(4).

Telehealth does present its own challenges and risks. The potential for liability increases when providers cannot assess a patient in person. Even with the advent of remote patient-monitoring tools such as blood pressure monitors, Bluetooth-enabled devices, and other wearable technology, there is no substitute for in-person care. There is even equipment that can remotely capture images and communicate biometric data, but even one missed symptom can be problematic. Therefore, it is important to have proper protocols in place when implementing a telehealth option at your practice.

We can review your professional liability policy to ensure your coverage aligns with current telemedicine mandates and guidelines.

Contact us today. We are happy to put our expertise to work for you.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.ama-assn.org/practice-management/digital/ama-quick-guide-telemedicine-practice
  2. https://telehealth.hhs.gov/providers/
  3. https://www.cchpca.org/telehealth-policy/current-state-laws-and-reimbursement-policies
  4. http://exclusive.multibriefs.com/content/telemedicine-webside-manner-and-barriers-to-care/healthcare-administration

Be Prepared for the Pandemic Aftermath

One of CARE’s industry partners, SE Healthcare, offers a COVID-19 Malpractice Mitigation Toolkit(1) for hospitals, physicians, and senior care facilities. This toolkit is designed to protect you and your team against the risk of emerging malpractice threats and potential claims related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Even the best-intended immunity laws will not prevent all pandemic-related medical malpractice claims because those laws are often focused on protecting treatment decisions surrounding COVID-19 patients. However, many non-COVID healthcare services and procedures were modified, delayed, or cancelled due to the pandemic. In turn, this crisis has created new legal risks, and the repercussions may place your organization at risk for malpractice suits.

The COVID-19 Malpractice Mitigation Toolkit features four components:

  • Brief survey to gauge liability risk
  • Dashboard for easy review of survey results
  • Education and actionable insights related to potential risks
  • Practical tools, templates, and other resources for immediate use

Although resources are stretched thin, NOW is the time to dedicate personnel, resources, and money to establish a contingency plan for when the pandemic fallout emerges. Ask your healthcare staff to provide input on what to include in the plan. Think about areas of risk specific to your health care practice. Potential areas susceptible to future litigation include:

  • Delayed diagnosis of other diseases
  • Ineffective care due to limited resources
  • Failure to appropriately implement telemedicine procedures leading to failed or delayed diagnosis
  • Lack of policies or procedures to prevent pandemic shortages
  • Failure to adequately create, update, or implement emergency preparedness plans
  • Inability to ensure ethical guidelines in place for appropriate allocation of resources
  • Failure to appropriately assure competencies for expanded scope of practice

Contact SE Healthcare(2) to learn more about this valuable toolkit. Here at CARE, we can show you other resources and benefits available to CARE members to help your practice navigate ever-changing mandates and policies.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.sehealthcarequalityconsulting.com/covid-19-malpractice-mitigation-toolkit/
  2. info@sehqc.com
  3. https://care-ins.com/contact/