Malpractice Prone: Do Providers Have Common Traits?

Is there a set of traits that identify malpractice claim-prone providers? Or at least that identify complaint-prone trends? A recent study(1) presented findings that may help industry experts identify and mitigate future risk based on historical data. For example, in that study, approximately 1% of all physicians accounted for 32% of paid claims. Additionally, the risk of recurrence increased with the number of previously paid claims. For example, providers who already had three paid claims had three times the risk of incurring another. In other words, they have a 24% chance of acquiring another paid claim within two years. 

Generally speaking, male physicians over age 35 were in the greatest risk category. Additionally, these specialties were at higher risk for litigation(2):

  • Neurosurgeons
  • Orthopedic Surgeons
  • General Surgeons
  • Plastic Surgeons
  • Obstetricians/Gynecologists

However, the issue isn’t simply a matter of being a male neurosurgeon who graduated from medical school at least five years ago. If other factors can be isolated, then providers and healthcare organizations need to develop programs to reduce the likelihood of adverse incidents that lead to malpractice litigation.

Algorithms and risk assessments are already in place for insurers, with underwriters and actuaries studying data and trends every day. Actuarial analysis for liability coverage creates specific, cost-aligned policies and programs. But data isn’t a person. And malpractice is not always a measurable action. A patient’s propensity to sue is based on many factors, not the least of which is their perceived relationship with their provider(3).

While an evidence-driven trend may exist, the real question is how to harness this data into actionable future risk mitigation. Does the defense of malpractice suits only play a reactive role in the healthcare industry? Certainly, more research is needed to determine whether statistics can be used for quality improvement efforts, including counseling, training, and supervision.

Contact us if you are interested in learning more about how actuarial analysis aids us in forecasting your practice’s litigation potential.

Footnotes

  • https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1506137
  • https://www.physiciansweekly.com/examining-proneness-to-malpractice-claims/
  • https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/02/upshot/to-be-sued-less-doctors-should-talk-to-patients-more.html

Reimbursement Rates: Don’t Settle for Less

As with anything in the healthcare industry, reimbursement rates are constantly in flux. New providers are often caught between the urgency of signing contracts in order to expand their patient base and the time it takes to negotiate fees(1) that accurately reflect their experience and talent.

Lack of experience can definitely be a liability when it comes to negotiating power. Results are what providers need to prove their value to insurance networks. However, providers can’t get results without being part of a network. Lacking results, a provider’s next best asset is data. Do some homework on your available network options, also taking into consideration providers in both similar and parallel specialties. A strong medical network works just as a strong social network does: it’s who/what you know and who/what they know.

Reimbursement rates are influenced by more than a single physician’s skill. The entire office staff is a reflection of what the physician is worth, including any advance practice providers (APPs), such as PAs and APRNs(3), that support the registered physician. The office’s reputation, clinical quality, professionalism, and patient satisfaction are all measurable components that can help you make an argument for increasing your reimbursement rates every time your contract is up for renegotiation. Keep in mind that insurance companies have their own competition to ward off, and every provider that they can depend on in their provider counts is an asset in their marketing arsenal too.

Our partner, SE Healthcare, has published an insightful piece, titled “Positioning Your Practice to Negotiate the Reimbursement You Deserve from Payers.(2)” This ebook explains strategies to uncover missed opportunities and grow your revenue by maximizing reimbursement rates.

Contact us(4) today so you can take advantage of the benefits of your CARE membership to utilize the expertise of our partner, SE Healthcare. They will help you assess your current reimbursement rates and formulate a strategy to maximize your current reimbursement contracts.

Footnotes

  • https://blog.evisit.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-physician-reimbursement-rates
  • https://www.sehealthcarequalityconsulting.com/download-ebook-positioning-your-practice-to-negotiate-the-reimbursement-you-deserve-from-payers/
  • https://www.physicianspractice.com/article/pas-deserve-direct-reimbursement-their-services
  • https://care-ins.com/contact/

The Fine Line Between Supervision and Accountability

In an earlier blog, we discussed the Swiss cheese model as it relates to risk management in healthcare. Today’s article takes a deeper dive into the element of supervision in that model, especially as it relates to Advanced Practice Providers (APPs). These APPs are generally defined(1) as professionals with advanced training, such as Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) and Physician Assistants (PAs). A practice itself might employ APPs or managing physicians may simply have supervisory responsibilities due to contractual arrangements directly with APPs or with facilities that use APPs. In either case, APPs are able to practice independently of physicians(2).

As this video explains, APPs are essential to professional practices in that they assist with provider workload and help keep costs down. Any office that is inundated enough to outsource some of its workload to APPs runs the risk of miscommunication, inadequate care, adverse events, and subsequent litigation. This resulting litigation could potentially involve both the supervising physician and the APP. That is why it is immensely important to outline the scope of the APP’s responsibilities, taking in to account their experience and ability to make judgement calls in the absence of the supervising provider.

The RiskFit helpline, managed by OmniSure, serves as a vital resource to CARE Professional Liability Association members. The professionals that operate this helpline can answer questions about the following:

  • Developing a collaborative provider/APP agreement
  • State-specific laws regarding APP scope of responsibilities
  • Hiring protocols
  • Proper risk reduction audit procedures
  • Capturing patient satisfaction metrics

All of these aspects of APP employment need to be carefully planned and documented to avoid potential litigation issues. The partnership between CARE and OmniSure puts a wealth of expertise at your fingertips to help you fill the holes in your risk management plan so that it does not turn into a block of Swiss cheese.

Contact us today if you have questions about whether your plan provides coverage for the APPs in your practice. Laws vary based on the state where you practice(2), and are constantly changing. Put our expertise to work for you in designing a coverage plan that perfectly suits your business.

Footnotes

  1. https://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2017/03/16/advanced-practice-providers-are-key-to-americas-healthcare-future/#2c8596759985
  2. https://www.studergroup.com/resources/articles-and-industry-updates/insights/august-2016/optimizing-the-value-of-advanced-practice-provider
  3. https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/clinical-care/aprn-and-pa-scope-practice-rules-draw-fire